Perseid Meteor Shower 2013

Robert Bigelow

One of the most reliable meteor showers of the year will peak on August 12. That’s when Earth will collide with a stream of particles left behind by comet Swift-Tuttle. These particles, which range in size from sand grains to pebbles, will hit Earth’s upper atmosphere at speeds of 130,000 miles per hour and vaporize about 50 miles above our heads. As they burn up, they produce the slivers of light streaking across the sky that we call the Perseid Meteor Shower.

Veteran astrophotographer Roberto Porto snapped this spectacular view of a Perseid meteor over Mount Teide National Park in the Canary Islands off the west coast of Africa on Aug. 11, 2012 during the peak of the 2012 Perseid meteor shower. The Milky Way and rock arch Zapata de la Reina (Queen's Shoe) are visible. Credit: Roberto Porto -

Veteran astrophotographer Roberto Porto snapped this spectacular view of a Perseid meteor over Mount Teide National Park in the Canary Islands off the west coast of Africa on Aug. 11, 2012 during the peak of the 2012 Perseid meteor shower. The Milky Way and rock arch Zapata de la Reina (Queen’s Shoe) are visible.
Credit: Roberto Porto

Earth passes through this particle stream every year in August. This year the peak of the Perseid meteor shower occurs on August 12 at 12 noon MDT. As the peak occurs during daylight, the best times to observe are from about 1:00 to 5:00 a.m. on August 12 and 13 when Utah is facing into the meteor stream. During these times, an observer away from city lights might see about 60 meteors per hour. The crescent moon will have set so its light will not interfere. If you cannot observe during those hours, do not despair, a few meteors will still be visible as soon the sky is dark on the evenings of August 11 and August 12.

Where is the best place to look? Look up. While meteors will appear to originate from the constellation Perseus in the northeast, they will be seen all over the sky. The most important aspect of observing a meteor shower is to be away from city lights. No equipment is needed to observe, so leave the telescope at home. Meteor showers are best seen with the eyes alone, taking in as much of the sky as possible. However, a reclining lawn chair and mosquito repellant may help make the observing session more comfortable. Happy observing!

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