October 24th, 2014
Waxing Crescent Moon
moon
Seth Jarvis

Congratulations, Mr. Ambassador!

Former planetarium staff member, and life-long amateur astronomer (of considerable expertise) Patrick Wiggins, known to most folks around here as a ”NASA Solar System Ambassador” has been singled out by NASA for a highly prestigious Distinguished Public Service Medal acknowledging his decades of invaluable…

Seth Jarvis

Clark Planetarium’s AstroVan in 1980 #tbt

Hansen Planetarium’s AstroVan began in 1980. We convinced Hertz to sell us one of their Chevrolet “Beauville” rental vans on the cheap, and got Ken Garff to donate the original AstroVan paint job. 

Callista Pearson

NASA Up Close: A Special “Night Vision” Event

Join Clark Planetarium for a special Night Vision event on Wednesday, February 26, 2014, for an up close look at NASA and the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket. 

Callista Pearson

NASA Traveling Exhibit Coming 2/26 – 3/2

Don’t miss the NASA Exploration Systems Directorate/Space Launch System (ESD/SLS) exhibit when it is on display here at Clark Planetarium.

Callista Pearson

Save the Date for Story Musgrave

Celebrate the stars in April 2014 with Clark Planetarium. On April 17, 2014, Clark Planetarium will host its A Star Shines the Brightest fundraiser, with six-time shuttle astronaut Story Musgrave as our keynote speaker.

Rob Morris

Brightest Gamma Ray Burst

“Breaking News!  The brightest Gamma-Ray Burst ever recorded occurred at 1:47 am Mountain Time on April 27th. 

Robert Bigelow

Testing the Arm on Mars

After a month on Mars and after driving about the length of a football field (109 meters), NASA’s Curiosity rover is stopping for a second phase of instrument check out.

Robert Bigelow

Target Practice on Mars

One of the most anticipated steps in the instrument checkout on NASA’s Curiosity rover is the first use of Curiosity’s laser on a Martian rock, and this past weekend, Curiosity set its target on a 3-inch rock about 9 feet away from the rover.

Robert Bigelow

Curiosity’s Middle Name

Patience. For individuals that have become accustomed to nearly instant information access, the slow pace of data and images trickling from the newest rover on Mars may be frustrating.

Callista Pearson

Cruising to Mars

There’s always anomalies when scientists send new equipment out into space.